Education

  1. EdTech And The Hundredth Monkey Effect

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    Photo via emaze.com

    In the mid 1970’s, Lyall Watson and Lawrence Blair popularized the idea of the “Hundredth Monkey Effect”. Watson and Blair shared the findings of Japanese scientists who studied the behavior of monkeys on a beach. These scientists observed some of the monkeys learning to wash sweet potatoes, and, after a period of repetition and observation, this behavior spread to other monkeys. Once a critical number of monkeys incorporated this behavior into their routine, monkeys on nearby islands spontaneously replicated the same behavior as well. The accuracy of these findings has been debated, but there is still an important takeaway from the study: the actions of one individual can implement widespread change.

    So what does this have to do with edtech? Continue reading

  2. Important Questions To Ask Before Purchasing EdTech Products

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    Photo via littlerockfamily.com

    Navigating education technology and the many facets that go into it can be incredibly challenging. From delegating a budget for education technology, to finding a product and implementing it in schools, it can be an extremely taxing process. In this three-part blog series, we will be going over the stages of purchasing, finding, and implementing education technology.

    Through speaking with teachers, principals, and chief technology officers,  we have learned that, when it comes to purchasing new technology for schools, there are important questions that need to be asked. We also learned more about must-ask questions from ISTE attendees. Continue reading

  3. Game-Based Learning: The Whys and Hows

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    Photo via Sydney Morning Herald

    How many times have you witnessed a student rereading a book or flipping through flash cards in order to memorize material? Perhaps you’ve even used this method yourself at one time. Few would label this method of memorization as “enjoyable”. A main issue with this method is that students quickly become tired of flipping through flash cards or reading the same material over and over; they become disengaged, and the chances of them retaining the information decrease significantly. Are there any alternatives to the methods of using flash cards or simply rereading material? Studies show that playing online educational games can be a great substitute. Continue reading

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